Tag Archives: BBQ

Beer, Can?

The weekend was quite exciting for me as I finally made time to do something I’ve always wanted to try – ROASTING A BEER CAN CHICKEN ($24)!

IMG_8215.JPG

I started out by making a marinade with Soy Sauce, Minced Garlic and Melted Butter. Just mix it all together (blend it in a blender is best because the mince garlic can be a bit chunky for the marinade injector)! Once that’s done, I had to set up the beer can chicken roaster.

The Napoleon Beer Can Chicken Roaster comes in 2 parts – the pan on the bottom and the metal legs that holds the chicken up. Insert the ends of the metal legs into the holes of the pan such that the legs are standing up. Then, grab a can of beer (or soda) and empty out half the can. Squeeze this can into the middle of the pan and beneath the metal legs. After which, you can place the butt of the chicken over the standing legs and can. If you like, you can even put half an onion inside the chicken before you do this for some extra flavor.

I used the Napoleon basting brush ($14) to cover all of the chicken (don’t forget to get into all the nooks and crannies) with the marinade. After which, I inserted the marinade injector ($19.90) into a few different meaty areas of the Chicken.

IMG_8194.JPGimg_02171.png

Leave the chicken to soak up the marinade for a bit and use this time to light up the grill. I put the grill (Napoleon Lex485RSIB) at medium heat on 2 of the burners and I used my Napoleon Heat Resistant Gloves ($75) to place the chicken and roaster between them. It’s such good protection that I wasn’t afraid to get anywhere near the fire!

IMG_8202.JPG

IMG_8220.JPG

I closed the hood and left it there for about 25-30 minutes, opening it up every 7 minutes to check on the chicken and to baste it with the marinade so it keeps moist and tasty. I also used a smoker cup ($45) with beer flavoured wood chips ($20) from Axtschlag to give it a smoky flavor.

IMG_8224.JPG

When the chicken was done, I took it off the grill and used the Napoleon Digital Thermometer ($29.90) to make sure (it’s done when the internal temperature is at 165 Degrees Fahrenheit or 75 Degress Celcius). It was so tender and juicy because of the marinade that had been injected into it, and the skin was crispy all over because it was exposed to the flames all around. Overall, it was a very delicious chicken and I would do it again!

To purchase any of these products, check out libertypatio.com or visit Butcher’s Dog (Great World City), Zac Butchery (Chun Tin or Figaro St) or Decofix (Serene Centre).

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Grills, Gas & Regulators: 101

I did a post about getting gas for your BBQ a while back (I mean, years back!) – so if any of you are looking for the 411 on gas tanks and canisters in Singapore, this would be the most updated info you can get.

WHICH WORKS WITH WHAT?
BRAND: Can I use any gas regulator for any brand of gas tank? The answer is no. Some gas tanks work with different gas regulators, while others do not. Always check with the company that supplied the gas regulator to you (whether it’s the BBQ company or the gas supplier) which brand of gas tank will be suitable for the regulator you’re using. Even if the regulator fits the tank, it doesn’t mean it will work.

TANK SIZE: Larger grills need different sized gas tanks from smaller grills – yes, this means different gas regulators too. For example, any BBQ with 4 burners or less would need a regulator for a 12.7kg gas tank, whereas any BBQ with more than 4 burners would need a regulator for a 11.3kg gas tank (I know, it is weird that the larger BBQ needs a smaller gas tank). This information is specific to Esso and Mobil LPG tanks.

HOW SMALL CAN I GO?
It’s really hard to get a small gas tank in Singapore – but for those of you who are looking – you can actually still find the 4.5kg ones here, but they are very pricey and you have to get a special regulator from the gas supplier too. Users only want the 4.5kg tank because they can store it in their BBQ cabinets, but really, it’s not practical or worth the buck because it runs out so fast and it’s about 2.5 times the price of a large tank. Furthermore, it’s not compatible with larger grills because there’s just not enough pressure in the tank to keep a large BBQ running.

Some BBQs like the TravelQ TQ285X and the TQ285 table top grill, have the option of regulators that work with camping gas. No, camping gas is not the same as the gas you use for steamboats. These run out really fast, but they’re bought more for the convenience of being able to take them around – especially if you intend to go camping somewhere or have a small picnic in the great outdoors.

If a large gas tank stored outside your BBQ cabinet really irks you because it’s too ugly, perhaps consider an LPG tank cover that comes in different colours.

orange &  black

“Tacky no more!” Exclaimed the LPG tank.

CAN I GET PIPED IN?
TOWN GAS: If you’re looking to connect your BBQ to town gas (or piped gas), it’s definitely possible. You will have to check with your BBQ supplier if they are able to do this for you. Do not do it yourself, as you risk forfeiting the grill warranty.

SAFETY FIRST!
My gas supplier offered me an adjustable regulator – should I use it?
I wouldn’t recommend using it because if the pressure has been adjusted incorrectly, you could be looking at a flaming disaster as sometimes too much gas is released (believe me, hand-to-heart, this has happened!). Instead, check with the BBQ supplier for their recommendation first.

Here are some tips from Union Energy on how to store your LPG tank safely.

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Straight Off The Rotisserie

Previously, I discussed grilling picanha (Brazilian beef rump cap) directly on the grill. Over the weekend, I decided to do something a bit more special and use the rotisserie to see how different the meat would turn out.

Here I have half a slab of picanha (they are normally no more than 1.5kg, so this is about 700gms). The pinkish epidermis of the meat can get quite tough, so I suggest removing it before sticking the rotisserie spike in.

IMG_1116
As with all churrasco, get ready some coarse salt. I’m using a coarse salt herb blend here. Roll the meat up and stick the rotisserie spike through. I’m using the rotisserie spikes here because my rotisserie spike is a bit thin, so the meat needs a little help staying in place. Ideally, you don’t want to have to poke more holes in the meat or squeeze it in any way to avoid the juices flowing out.

IMG_1117

Here’s a short video of how I salted the meat while on the rotisserie. I like it really salty, but it’s not for everyone, so just put a light coat of salt if you’re not too sure. You can just do it while it’s rotating. After salting it, close the hood to keep the heat in – we’re doing this at medium to high heat – around 350 degrees celsius. Check on it every now and again to make sure it doesn’t over cook.

IMG_1125

The flames get pretty big as the salt falls from the meat into the fire below while rotating.

IMG_1131

I remove the picanha a few times during the grilling process to slice off the meat on the outside, the way they would do it at a Brazilian BBQ place. What you’ll find is that you can keep having that beef “bark” on the outside every time you put the meat back on the rotisserie to cook, while the inside remains tender and juicy.

You can get a rotisserie for your BBQ from Liberty Patio.

 

 

 

Tagged , , , , ,

Copacabana Style!

Over Easter Break, I went to Brazil to visit my boyfriend’s family. We started off in Rio and drove up to Belo Horizonte (time-wise, we’re talking a drive from Singapore to Penang – not including the time it took for tow to come get our rental because it broke down in the middle of Petropolis!).

While in Rio, we had some grilled beef and tapioca (or yucca, as they call it over there). I thought this was really interesting because I never really had tapioca as a savoury dish before. My grandma said that during WW2 in Singapore, they never really had much to eat, and because Tapioca was easy to grow, that’s what they had a lot of. When I was little, she would usually steam some for us, and we’d sprinkle some sugar on it. Of course, we also had other tapioca things like tapioca cake and Thai-style tapioca dessert with coconut cream.

IMG_9830IMG_9978

Brazilian BBQ (or Churrasco) is available pretty much anywhere you go in Brazil. You can find it on the interstate, in shopping malls, on the beach, out in the country, in people’s homes – pretty much everywhere. Barbecuing is such a big part of the Brazilian culture.

The beach side restaurant we went to in Copacabana was considered a “fancier” place, in a sense that it was more touristy and pricier. Although, everything in Rio is a little bit more expensive than elsewhere in the country. In this restaurant, they used a teppanyaki-style electric grill. In most other places, including homes, you’ll find that they grill using charcoal. Gas BBQs are virtually non-existent.

IMG_9973

When we got to Belo Horizonte, many homes and restaurants will even make their own BBQ grills out of brick. They look like wood fire pizza ovens that you see in pizzerias here. The idea is simple – there are 2 sections to the BBQ – a base where you place the charcoal, and the grilling area which consists of 2 levels. There isn’t a full grilling surface that stays put in one section. Instead, the cook will move the grills (grilling trays with handles) as they see fit around the BBQ.

Oh, and as a testament to how much people BBQ over there, they only sell charcoal bags of 10kg. Compared to Singapore’s measly 3-4kg bags sold at supermarkets. Wuuuttt…

IMG_9853.JPG

To have your own personal Brazilian BBQ experience in Singapore, you could try out The Brazil Dream, which has a Brazilian chef for hire who can bring Churrasco to your home or any event.

Tagged , , , , ,

BURNING PAPER

As I’ve probably mentioned in one of my earlier posts, I love German brand Axtschlag because of it’s wide selection of artisanal smoking wood and quirky packaging. Most brands offer the basic woodchip varieties – Hickory, cherry, apple and the like. But Axtschlag range extends to more unusual flavours like Plum, Wine, Beer, Walnut, Beech – just to name a few. What’s even more interesting are the kinds of wood products they offer like grilling papers, wood chunks, herb boxes and grilling planks.

Here’s a fun little thing I tried over the weekend – Axtschlag Barbecue Grilling Papers.

IMG_9354

What exactly are Grilling Papers? They’re basically thin pieces of wood that you can wrap your food around and smoke.

Here, you can see that I’ve stretched out some chicken wings and wrapped them neatly in the grilling paper. It’s pretty simple to use.

First, you soak the paper in water for about 30 minutes. While waiting, marinate the wings. I used a little salt and honey. Once the grill papers have softened up enough, you can wrap them around the meat and tie it up with the string provided (you will need scissors for this).

Next, place the food on the grill. On a 3 burner BBQ with 6 wings, I turned on 2 burners at medium heat. These are thin so they catch fire very easily – you’ll have to watch them closely and swap them around the less hot areas of the BBQ to prevent them from getting burnt.IMG_9363

Don’t worry too much about the strings burning off, as the wood will stay in place.

The end result will be something like this:

IMG_9369

As with most smoking, you’ll get a very juicy and tender inside and a lovely flavour of wood infused into the meat. These cook pretty fast, so the flavour of the wood isn’t too intense. Overall, I think my favourite smoking method is still using the grilling planks – it’s a lot easier to handle and the size of the meat that you’re smoking doesn’t matter.

Axtschlag grilling papers are available from Liberty Patio at $18 for a pack of 8 sheet. Available in Cherry, Alder and Western Red Cedar.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Cheap BBQ Grills? Yes, yes, yes!

It’s almost Christmas and if you haven’t found a gift for your friends, family, spouse (or as youngsters like myself call them these days – “bae”)  yet, perhaps consider getting them a BBQ or if they already have one, some BBQ accessories.

Liberty Patio X Proline is back with their bi-annual BBQ warehouse sale!

Get deals of up to 50% off on sample, past season and display models – AND accessories (especially wood products). These prices make getting a BBQ in singapore much more affordable – More details below:

Check out the sneak peeks here:
IMG_7982
Axtschlag Herb Boxes Fish/Meat –
Original Price: $32
Sale Price: $20
Axtschlag Herb Box Refills Fish/Meat –
Original Price: $28
Sale Price: $18

:IMG_7983
Axtschlag Wine Woodchips:
Original Price: $20
Sale Price: $12
Axtschlag Hickory Sawdust:
Original Price: $18
Sale Price: $10

IMG_7981Axtschlag Grilling Planks XS, R, XL (Cherry/ Alder/ Cedar):
Original Price: $28 – $36
Sale Price: $18 – $24

IMG_7980Instafire fire/charcoal starter packs:
Original Price: $2.50
Sale Price: $1

IMG_7979Spatulas & Turners (Kitchen Aid/Rachel Ray)
Original Price: $12.99 – $17.99
Sale Price: $10 – 15

IMG_7985
Masport Vacationer (Sample Set)
Original Price: $1926
Sale Price: $1637.10

IMG_7988
Ultra Chef UC430 (Display Set)
Original Price: $1177
Sale Price: $823.90

IMG_7989
Liberty Spitfire Pro (Refurbished)
Original Price: $321
Sale Price: $160.50

IMG_7987
Masport Entertainer Pro (Past Season)
Original Price: $1248
Sale Price:  $624

IMG_7986
Masport Lifestyle 4H (Display)
Original Price: $1490
Sale Price: $968.50

bbq warehouse sale aug 2015

Tagged , , , ,

Jack of All Grills

Have you been looking for a grill that has it all… the looks, the features, the compactness…. with a price tag that won’t break the bank? Well, hold on to your hats because I think I’ve found it.

The Liberty Chef Pro is a 3 burner gas BBQ that has everything I look for in a BBQ.

Firstly, size is always an issue for me. I don’t like a BBQ to be too in your face, especially in an apartment balcony. This BBQ is small for a 3 burner unit, and on top of that, it has one collapsible side table.

IMG_6578

It comes with a warming rack and a motorized rotisserie.

IMG_6581

I love that it comes with 2 cast iron grills and 1 cast iron hot plate. I don’t use the hot plate that often, but it’s so good to have it there for when you have eggs, veggies or anything that crumbles.

IMG_6579

The side burner is so handy for sauces and soups. You practically have an outdoor kitchen in this machine.

IMG_6580

IMG_6582

The downside to this BBQ is that you can’t fit the standard Singapore sized gas tank inside the cabinet. The cabinet is really very small. But I never recommend putting it inside anyway for safety reasons. I always have it stored outside, under the side table or behind the BBQ. It comes with a rain cover so you don’t have to worry about keeping it outdoors.

The Liberty Chef Pro is available from Liberty Patio at $999. This price is inclusive of delivery and assembly, rain cover, gas hose and regulator, and 1 year warranty. 

Tagged , , , , , ,

Got Wood? BBQ Smoker chips, wood planks, sawdust and more!

Recently, I’ve been getting a lot of enquiries about where to find smoker wood chips in Singapore. Most people either don’t know where to find them or if they know where to look, it’s just too unaffordable.

I’ve found the easiest and most affordable place to get my BBQ wood products is from Liberty Patio, because it also has the widest range I’ve seen so far.

You can get everything from Wood Chips to wood planks, grilling papers to herb boxes.

You’ll be able to find more famous BBQ brands such as Char-broil and Napoleon that charge about $14 per bag of woodchips, to gourmet brands that specialise in smoking products like Axtschlag and Best of the West.

My personal favourite is the new brand on the market — Axtschlag. Hailing from Germany, Axtschlag offers one of the widest ranges of BBQ wood products I’ve seen.

Axtschlag Wood Chips

New to Singapore, Axtschlag has flavours like Hickory, Apple, Wine, Beer, Whiskey, Beech, Alder and Cherry.

I’m absolutely crazy about the artwork on the packaging that teaches me how to use the products. The sassy lady is such a fun addition to the whole BBQ scene!

IMG_1945

I love the sassy artwork on the Axtschlag packaging.

Axtschlag carries more unique flavours such as Walnut, Wine, Strong beer and Whiskey. These go for $20 per kilo.

IMG_1936

Axtschlag’s gourmet flavours include Wine, Walnut, and Beer. $20 a KG.

IMG_1938

Other Axtschlag products include sawdust and grilling planks.

Looking for Sawdust and Grilling planks? Sawdust costs $18 a bag, and grilling planks start from $28.

IMG_1941

My favourite products in the Axtschlag range – Herb boxes!

Herb boxes and their refills keep this brand interesting. You can get them for meat or fish. These 30cm boxes contain herb mixtures of boldo leaves, rosemary, sage, lavender, red chilli, curry leaves OR birch leaves, lemon balm, lemon, dill, carrots, corn flower. Just place the food you’d like to smoke on these boxes and watch as the flavours take over once the smoking begins.

These are $32 a box, and $15 for the herb refill.

cedar paperscherry papers

Lastly, Axtschlag also carries grilling papers for $18 a packet. Each packet contains 8 pieces of wood paper. Just tie the wood paper around the prepared food and put them on the grill to smoke. Cherry flavour is my favourite with thai prawn paste chicken wings.

Check out all these items on Liberty Patio.

Till my next post! Enjoy Smokin’ on your grills!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

So tell me…

Tagged , , , , , , ,

YES! Napoleon has hit Singapore!

I’m really stoked that we’ve finally brought Napoleon to Singapore because we’ve been using our Masport Maestro Deluxe gas grill for almost 5 years now, and I think it’s time to retire it (it’s still in great working condition even though I’m really lazy when it comes to maintenance).Image

I have to say that they really had me sold on the whole infrared sizzle zone concept. This isn’t new technology. I say this because the original infrared cooking actually derives from the concept of burning charcoal, where you would have all those glowing red bits on the charcoal, instead you get 10,000 tiny little ports with tiny little flames on each burner. So really, similar cooking method to charcoal, but less mess. Hooray!

There are lots of other features on the Napoleon LEX485, but what really caught my attention is this accessory you can get called the Napoleon Charcoal Smoker Tray. Lots of customers come in and they ask, “hey, can I put charcoal inside my gas barbecue?” The answer is NO! Gas barbecues are built to take that kind of heat. Don’t confuse Lava rocks with charcoal. Lava rocks heat up, charcoal sets on fire!

ImageImage

Anyway, let’s continue. The Charcoal Tray is a brilliant way you can convert your gas barbecue into a charcoal one, simply by placing the tray above the burner (without the flame tamers) and adding in the charcoal. You’d light them simply by switching on your burner and leaving it for about 5 minutes, then switch it off (but leave the hood open the whole time). You can even add woodchips to the mix because it’s got a triangular slot on one corner with holes in them. This tray is made of cast iron, so it’s sturdy and takes heat really well.

Available from Liberty Patio.

Tagged , , ,