Tag Archives: bbq singapore

Super Smoker: Napoleon Apollo AS300K

I really am not a fan of charcoal for the sole reason that gas is just an easier way to go. The idea that I’d have to deal with starting up the charcoal and then cleaning up the ash after is just exhausting even to think about. But I have to say that using the Napoleon Apollo AS300K for the first time (and a few times after that – sorry this post came late) has really opened up my mind about the authenticity of flavour that comes with smoking with charcoal and woodchips/chunks/logs.

My first attempt of smoking up a Hickory Chicken went a little something like this:

I started the charcoal up using a charcoal starter, some old newspaper and some fire starters you can pick up from the super market. Just fill up the charcoal starter with a mix of fire starters and charcoal (I use coconut charcoal as the flavour is a bit more neutral, and they are natural and long-lasting – you can get this from Cold Storage). Crush up some old newspaper and stuff them at the bottom of the charcoal starter. Using a kitchen lighter, set the newspaper on fire and place either on the grill of the Apollo (or if you have a gas BBQ, you can use this to light up the charcoal too!) and put the lid over it as you wait. This should take about 20-25 minutes.

Once this is done, you can pour the charcoal into the charcoal basket, and add your woodchips/chunks/logs. I use a mix of Hickory woodchips and chunks which I had soaked in water an hour prior to adding them to the fire.

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Napoleon Apollo AS300K in Action!

I had already marinated the a whole chicken in barbecue sauce and salt. I didn’t do anything to the chicken other than clean it out, but on my second attempt, I butterflied the chicken and it cooked a lot better all through the chicken.

Before closing the hood, I attached the Napoleon Accu-Probe Bluetooth Thermometer probes to the chicken. I LOVE this device, which will be available in Singapore around August 2018, because it has up to 4 probes (though the set only comes with 2 probes, and you’ll have to get the others separately) which means you can check the temperatures of 4 different items in the smoker.

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ACCU-PROBE™ BLUETOOTH® THERMOMETER

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Napoleon Accu-Probe App on my iPhone

The Accu-probe thermometer links up with this Napoleon app which you can download for free, and the app has settings that will tell you when your chicken (or whatever meat you wish to select) is at the ideal-readiness temperature. It also tells you what temperature each probe is at, and there is also a few timers you can set the app to.

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Nice and Smokey Hickory-Smoker Chicken

I was able to go back inside the house and avoid the heat and smoke in the garden because of the Accu-Probe thermometer, and it let me know when the chicken had reach the ideal temperature for doneness. Really convenient!

The hickory chicken was incredibly smokey, so juicy and tender! The flavour is very much more intense than using a grilling plank or a smoker box in a gas BBQ, so the effort I put in in starting the charcoal was very worthwhile. Once you get over the charcoal lighting part, it really is quite easy to use because you don’t have to stand around all day (but basting it once in a while doesn’t hurt).

There’s a lot more to explore with the Napoleon AS300K because it actually has 2 chambers, hanging hooks, and a water basin, which means you can do anything from pekking duck, wet smoking, dry smoking, hot and cold smoking, and even just regular grilling if you want!

You can get the Napoleon Apollo Smoker AS300K from Liberty Patio for $599 (and $60 for the BBQ cover).

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BARBECUE LUNCH PREP WITH ASIAN FLAVORS

By @inspirecookeat

If you’ve ever had busy weeks working but considered eating healthier, you would have likely heard of meal prep. For the uninitiated, meal prep involves bulk cooking meals at one go to last for the week. This kind of eating plan is popular with gym-goers and health-conscious eaters, due to the flexibility of being able to choose what goes into your meals. Prepping meals ahead of time also has the added benefit of being money saving, as food is purchased in bulk.

I would say the only real drawback to meal prepping is taking the time to cook them on a weekend for the week! The payoff is more than worth it though; as you can control your portions, have meals that are good for you, and are also easier on your wallet.

Inspirecookeat has partnered up with Liberty Patio to come up with a great meal prep idea that you can make on the grill! Try this meal prep when you have taken out your barbeque for the weekend with friends, or you feel like you’d want to make use of good weather. In our meal prep, we use store-bought Asian soup mixes (laksa, and tom yum, with no added msg) to boost flavor with minimal effort. Just pick your favorite brand, and you are good to go!

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Vegetables on the Grill for Meal Prep!

Using chicken breasts for this meal prep allows for quick, even cooking. It also allows the marinade to get into the meat quickly!

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Using Chicken Breasts for Easy Flavor and Quick Marination

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Charred Bok Choi


Barbecue Meal Prep with Asian Flavors

Punchy Asian-flavored marinades such as Laksa and Tomyum transform an otherwise ordinary chicken breast into an exciting mid-day meal! Combined with healthy veggies and complex carbohydrates for maximum post-workout satisfaction.

 Prep Time 20 minutes
 Cook Time 50 minutes
 Total Time 1 hour 10 minutes
 Servings 5 portions
 Author Inspirecookeat

Ingredients

  • 3 large sweet potatoes washed and skins scrubbed
  • 2 large russet potatoes washed and skins scrubbed
  • 1/2 medium kabocha pumpkin seeded, washed and cut into large wedges
  • 2 large carrots peeled, washed, and halved lengthwise and across
  • 1 packet bok choi bunches sliced in half lengthwise and washed
  • 3 large chicken breasts skinless and boneless
  • 1 packet tomyum soup paste
  • 1 packet laksa soup paste
  • 2 tbsp cooking oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat barbecue to medium heat.

  2. Rub sweet potatoes, russet potatoes, pumpkin, carrots and bok choi with cooking oil. Season lightly with salt and pepper.

  3. Halve chicken breasts by slicing down the middle, so that you get two flat pieces per breast. Mix half the chicken in a bowl with the tomyum paste, and the other half with the laksa paste. Cover and set aside to marinate.

  4. Place all vegetables except bok choi on barbecue grill and cook, covered for 30-40 minutes, turning once halfway, until everything is tender. Remove to cool.

  5. To cook chicken breast, increase heat to medium high, and cook for 3-5 minutes per side, until nicely golden, and the internal temperature of the meat reads 150°F (66°C). Remove and set aside to cool for packing

  6. Finally, to cook the bok choi, place the bok choi over the grill and cook, turning occasionally until the stems have a slight char, and the leaves start to wilt slightly. Remove from heat.

  7. Prepare 5 lunch containers, and distribute the vegetables evenly between them. Top with 1 chicken breast each (or more if you are hungry!). Once cooled, cover and store in fridge for reheating later in the week.

  8. Enjoy! (Later on..)

Recipe Notes

  • Use a variety of sweet potatoes (gold, purple, japanese) to mix things up!
  • The chicken breasts need to be of even thickness and flat to cook evenly on the grill. Pound them slightly to flatten if required.
  • When reheating, ensure all the food is hot. Reheating will also slightly wilt the bok choi, but this is desired.
  • Be sure to open the lid slightly for steam to vent when reheating in a microwave!
  • When grilling, the vegetables may not all cook at the same rate. In which case, remove the cooked ones, reposition the remainder and use the free space to cook the chicken!
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    Loving those Purple Sweet Potatoes

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    Ready for the Fridge!

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    Ready for the week ahead!

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    BBQLOVERS’ Note:
    All images and text credited to Eugene Chow. Check out the original post at inspirecookeat and follow him on Instagram @inspirecookeat for more grillin’ goodness!

    Find the Napoleon TQ285X TravelQ grill on Liberty Patio!

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A “Prestigious” Grill Weekend!

The first Napoleon Grill I ever used was the Napoleon Lex485RSIB. Now, this grill, while not top of the line, was already an impressive grill. There have always been a lot of “Oooh”s and “Ahh”s when it came to entertaining guests. The Lex served me well over the years of weekend BBQs, impromptu steak nights, experimental wood smoking challenges and even just cooking up a simple meal for myself. But it has come time for me to say goodbye (not because there’s anything wrong with my dear Lex, but because, well, I’m just a girl who really wanted something shiny and new *giggles*).

So which grill did I end up getting?

None other than the top of the line from Napoleon – the Prestige Pro 500RSIB. Yes, when I say top of the line, I mean it. Made in Canada, the 500RSIB is the smallest of Napoleon’s high-end Prestige Pro range.

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My new baby – the Napoleon Prestige Pro 500 RSIB!

Ok, so fine, it’s a pretty-looking thing. But what’s so good about it, you ask?

Let’s start with how amazing the fire power is on this grilling machine. The new Prestige Pro has a whopping 80,000 BTU’s of power (that’s 48,000 on the main burners, 14,000 and 18,000 on the side and rear infrared burners). Our steaks were getting done so fast on the main grill, it was unbelievable, I didn’t even need the side infrared burner to sear the steaks!

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Check out those perfect grill lines, thanks to the Napoleon Wave Grills!

The other thing I love about this grill is that it’s basically 70-80% made out of 304 stainless steel (which means easy to clean and less susceptible to rust marks than 430 stainless steel). It’s also got incredibly thick and sturdy stainless steel grills and sear plates, making it long-lasting and easy to clean. The firebox is made of die-cast aluminum so you won’t find that the burners will get detached easily from parts on the inside of the BBQ that may break away over time, and the knobs on the control panel also light up (in beautiful blue!).  Overall, I have to say that I love this grill because of how well made it is, its sleek look, and quality of fire control which enables me to cook the perfect steak!

On a side note, for those of you wondering what ever happened to my Lex grill, I gave it to my boyfriend (see evidence below that it is gone to a loving home).

Want to get yourself some Napoleon grills and accessories? Visit Liberty Patio, or order them in person from Decofix (Serene Centre), all Parisilk Stores, D’galleria stores, and Handy House (117 Upp East Coast Rd).

For Tramontina accessories, visit Zac Butchery and The Butcher’s Dog (Great World City). Also, enter “WEBSPECIAL10” to get a 10% discount on top of already discounted Tramontina products on sale at libertypatio.com! – offer ends 30 September 2017!

  • 80,000 BTU’s
  • 80,000 BTU’s
  • 74,000 BTU’s
  • 74,000 BTU’s
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Beer, Can?

The weekend was quite exciting for me as I finally made time to do something I’ve always wanted to try – ROASTING A BEER CAN CHICKEN ($24)!

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I started out by making a marinade with Soy Sauce, Minced Garlic and Melted Butter. Just mix it all together (blend it in a blender is best because the mince garlic can be a bit chunky for the marinade injector)! Once that’s done, I had to set up the beer can chicken roaster.

The Napoleon Beer Can Chicken Roaster comes in 2 parts – the pan on the bottom and the metal legs that holds the chicken up. Insert the ends of the metal legs into the holes of the pan such that the legs are standing up. Then, grab a can of beer (or soda) and empty out half the can. Squeeze this can into the middle of the pan and beneath the metal legs. After which, you can place the butt of the chicken over the standing legs and can. If you like, you can even put half an onion inside the chicken before you do this for some extra flavor.

I used the Napoleon basting brush ($14) to cover all of the chicken (don’t forget to get into all the nooks and crannies) with the marinade. After which, I inserted the marinade injector ($19.90) into a few different meaty areas of the Chicken.

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Leave the chicken to soak up the marinade for a bit and use this time to light up the grill. I put the grill (Napoleon Lex485RSIB) at medium heat on 2 of the burners and I used my Napoleon Heat Resistant Gloves ($75) to place the chicken and roaster between them. It’s such good protection that I wasn’t afraid to get anywhere near the fire!

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I closed the hood and left it there for about 25-30 minutes, opening it up every 7 minutes to check on the chicken and to baste it with the marinade so it keeps moist and tasty. I also used a smoker cup ($45) with beer flavoured wood chips ($20) from Axtschlag to give it a smoky flavor.

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When the chicken was done, I took it off the grill and used the Napoleon Digital Thermometer ($29.90) to make sure (it’s done when the internal temperature is at 165 Degrees Fahrenheit or 75 Degress Celcius). It was so tender and juicy because of the marinade that had been injected into it, and the skin was crispy all over because it was exposed to the flames all around. Overall, it was a very delicious chicken and I would do it again!

To purchase any of these products, check out libertypatio.com or visit Butcher’s Dog (Great World City), Zac Butchery (Chun Tin or Figaro St) or Decofix (Serene Centre).

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Buying your first Gas Grill

Gas grills, as with most things in Singapore, don’t come cheap. We don’t manufacture many things here because labour is expensive and so is land for factories. So when you’re looking for a gas grill, you’ll want to make sure you can get the most bang for your buck.

Here is a check list of things to look out for when purchasing your first gas grill:

  1. What does the BBQ come with? What are you REALLY paying for?
    The price tag can be quite deceiving at times. Why does one 2 burner BBQ cost so much less than the other? Before deciding, find out if the BBQ comes with some essentials like a gas hose and regulator, and a rain cover (which is very necessary in Singapore weather!). Sometimes you’ll be getting a motorized rotisserie – it’s good to check on this one, especially if your BBQ comes with a back burner. Also, don’t forget to check on the local warranty period and what the warranty covers. Some local companies cover transport, service as well as replacement parts under their warranty.

  2. Why buy a grill in Singapore when it’s so much cheaper overseas?
    It’s not always the case that it’s cheaper overseas – take one of Napoleon’s more popular models, the Triumph T325SB. It’s USD499 (SGD698) on amazon, and after adding the standard amazon shipping charges and import fees, you’re looking at about USD840, which equates to SGD1174. It costs SGD999 to get it locally (or SGD1199 with the rain cover and rotisserie unit). For this amount, you will be getting your BBQ with a gas hose and regulator suitable for use in Singapore, 1-2 day delivery straight to your door, free assembly, and a local warranty which covers repairs, transport and replacement part costs.
  3. Materials!
    A BBQ grill can be made out of different materials so you have to know if the materials you’re paying for are justifiable. Standard materials for the bulk of the BBQ are usually stainless steel or powder-coated steel, but can also come in die-cast aluminum (usually for the fire box), chrome-plated steel (for the warming rack), and of course, cast iron (for the cooking grids and griddles). 304 stainless steel is probably the highest grade of stainless steel you can get for a standard gas grill, but most will be made of 430 or a mix of both materials. Why does it matter? Singapore’s humidity and rainy weather means lots of moisture everywhere, and moisture is bad for metal, especially when the grade of stainless steel is low. You’ll find corrosion and rust are a common sight.

    How do you know what kind of steel you’re getting? Do the magnet test. Magnets don’t stick to 304 stainless steel, but they do to 430 and powder-coated steel. Sometimes a BBQ will have a double-skinned hood, which means two layers of metal – the magnet test can be tricky here, because the hood could have a layer of 304 on the outside, and 430 on the inside. It’s designed this way to protect the more moisture-exposed areas of the BBQ.

    If you’re looking at a BBQ, and it has a steep price tag, check if the materials are 304 stainless steel or die-cast aluminum. That might be what you’re paying for.

  4. Other features – Burners, side burners, foldable side tables…
    Other parts you could be paying extra for are the burner power, so compare the BTU/kW with other similar BBQs. Some BBQs come with a side burner or back burner, and some will even be infrared types which are more expensive. Check if the side tables are foldable (if you have a space problem) and if the LPG tank can fit in the cabinet (not necessary, but helpful if you want a sleek integrated look). Other little features such as condiments racks, chopping boards, lights, hooks… these could be small little extras that make the BBQ special.

  5. Lastly, where is it made?
    Where the BBQ is made can contribute to the final price point just because it’s cheaper to ship from China than North America. Some brands will have factories in both locations producing different model ranges. For example, you might have Weber manufacturing their lower end range in China, and their higher end range in the USA, while Napoleon manufactures their entry-level range in both Canada and China, while their high-end Prestige and Rogue R425SIB models are all made in Canada.
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5 reasons to LOVE the Rogue

Napoleon’s latest Rogue gas BBQ grill series might just be the most perfect one yet for the Singaporean BBQ lover. The grills (R425, R425SB & R425SIB) have many amazing features, but let me give you my top 5 faves!

 

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From left to right: R425S, R425SB, R425SIB

 

  1. Quality, Quality, Quality!
    These BBQs are made of such quality materials – across the board, all Rogues have a die-cast aluminum firebox. Why does this matter? Die-cast aluminum is much stronger than welded steel, which means that the areas holding up the burners won’t give way easily.

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    Check out the die-cast aluminum fire box!

    The highest-end of all these models is the R425SIB (which is still made in Canada – many BBQ companies have shifted their production to China, including Weber’s Spirit and Genesis line) and is made mostly out of 304 and 430 stainless steel which fares very well in our weather. Even the grills are made of stainless steel (the other 2 have cast iron grills).

    Now let’s talk heat – you’re looking at about 3.5kw per main burner and 2.6kw for sear zone – this is pretty good when you compare it to a Weber Spirit S320, which is 3.1kw per main burner and 2.1kw  for the sear zone – albeit that the sear zone for the Rogue is a 2-in-1 with its side burner.

  2. Size Does Matter
    I know, I know – size is a problem especially when all you have is a balcony to work with. I love that all the Rogue series BBQs come with 2 foldable side tables, which comes in very handy when you want to pack it away to a corner.IMG_5320
  3. Extra on the Side
    While the R425 doesn’t come with the side burner (as some of you won’t use this feature), the R425sb and R425SIB both come with side burners, and what’s even more awesome is the R425SIB comes with an infrared side burner that doubles up as a sear zone – it’s cool because BBQs with this feature don’t usually come with a foldable side table and are almost always large.What’s even more awesome is the R425SIB comes with an infrared side burner that doubles up as a sear zone – it’s cool because BBQs with this feature don’t usually come with a foldable side table and are almost always large.
  4. Gas What?
    We can’t change that the LPG tanks sizes in Singapore are huge, but we can change the size of the cabinets that house the tanks. Here’s looking at a 12.7kg LPG tank INSIDE the cabinet of the Rogue. I know, satisfying isn’t it?
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  5. Absolutely CHAR-ming!
    Lastly, if you miss the taste of charcoal, you can still have it whenever you want. The Rogue comes with the option of the Charcoal Smoker Tray, which converts your Rogue into a charcoal BBQ. It’s so simple, all you do is fill the tray with charcoal, close the hood and light it up through the burners. Wait about 15-20 mins, switch the gas fire off, and you’ll have a charcoal BBQ going – easy peasy!
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You can get the Napoleon Rogue Series from Liberty Patio, prices starting from $1498. Price includes delivery, assembly, gas hose and regulator, rain cover and motorized rotisserie kit.

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Bargain Buys: BBQ Warehouse Sale

What better way to celebrate National Day than to chill at home with the fam (and friends too!) and catch the parade!

Liberty Patio X Proline’s bi-annual BBQ warehouse sale is back this weekend – just in time for us to get a grill for the holiday. As usual, the sale will feature past season barbecues, sample barbecues, display units and those with cosmetic defects, as well as bbq accessories. All BBQs are new and never been used. Details on the sale are in the flyer at the bottom of this post.

Here are some examples of what you’ll find at the sale, but be quick, as the popular models will be the first to go:

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Napoleon Triumph T325 Display Unit U.P.$1391 Sale Price: $974 (with cover and rotisserie)

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Napoleon LE3 Display Unit U.P.$2568 Sale Price:$2055 (with cover and rotisserie)

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Masport Lifestyle 3H Display Unit: $1230.50 Sale price: $985 (with cover)

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Liberty Chef S3 Display Unit: U.P. $799 Sale Price: $599.25

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HICKORY & CEDAR: A BOLD BLEND

 

I’ve been grilling every single day now – it’s not just the BBQ parties I’ve been throwing – I mean, I’ve been coming home and turning the grill on like it’s instinctive or embedded in my brain to do it. I like to call it the “December Feels” – where you just gotta party like a boss, every day until New Year’s.

Anyway, I know it’s already the 29th, but let’s backtrack a little to Christmas. I had a special request from my dad to smoke an entire chicken on the grill. I’ve never done a whole chicken before, but…

Challenge Accepted!

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I call this dish – The Bold Blend
In one of my earlier posts, I discussed the different types of smoking wood. Hickory is usually used for red meats, and Cedar usually for fish – but I decided to put them together to see what I could get.

Since Hickory is the stronger flavour, I used the Hickory in a smoker cup, and placed it away from the chicken, and placed the chicken between the 2 XL cedar planks, so the smoke from the planks would be more concentrated around the meat.

While smoking, the wood gave off such a strong scent. My cousins who had just walked into the garden commented that it smelled like Canada. I have to agree.

The outcome of this process gives you a distinct smokey flavour on the epidermis of the chicken, while the inside is absolutely tender and juicy. I only smoked this for about 50 minutes, but I reckon if you smoked it a bit longer than that with just a smoker cup, and basted it every hour, you could get a more thorough flavor throughout the chicken.

Here are the Ingredients you’ll need:

  1. 1 whole chicken (cleaned out inside)
  2. Butt Rub (I use Bad Byron’s, but you can find similar seasoning from the Butcher’s Dog. The base ingredients of this rub is onion, garlic, salt, pepper, paprika and chipotle)
  3. Coarse Sea Salt

Here are the smoking accessories you’ll need:

  1. 1 cup of Hickory Wood Chips (I used a full Axtschlag Smoker Cup)
  2. 1 Smoker Box (Or smoker cup / smoker tube)
  3. 2 x XL Axtschlag Western Red Cedar Grilling Planks

First things first. Soak the wood chips in water for an hour and place them in the smoker cup. I also soaked the 2 grilling planks for the same amount of time.

I used the latest smoker cup from German brand, Axtschlag. It’s wonderfully solid – 304 stainless steel and is made in Germany. Definitely NOT a buy and throw away kind of item.

After the wood has soaked, prop the chicken in between the 2 grilling planks and start rubbing the chicken all around with coarse sea salt and butt rub. Use enough to cover the whole chicken and leaving some on the grilling planks too.

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Place the smoker cup between the grill and the sear plate, on the far end of the fire box, and just above a burner. Place the grilling planks at first, closer to the middle of the cooking surface. Switch the burners on the side of the smoker cup on, as well as the middle burner (this is based on a 3 burner BBQ – here, I am using a Napoleon LEX485).

Once burners are on (medium to high heat), close the hood and allow the wood to start smoking. Turn the fire down to low-medium, and If the grilling planks catch fire and the fire is really big, shift them to the other side of the grill without the fire.

close the hood and wait for about 45 mins – 1 hour, checking on the meat once in a while, flipping it over at about 30 mins into the smoking process – cook until golden brown.

Enjoy!

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Ai, Picanha! : Grilling the Brazilian Prize Cut

My latest BBQ obsession is Brazilian Churrasco (pronounced like SHOE-HASS-KO). I’ve always loved a good ol’ Brazilian BBQ, but churrasco restaurants are pretty limited here in Singapore and not to mention, pricey. So instead of eating out – I thought, why not just do it myself at home?

For this post, we’re using an Ultra Chef UC430 to grill Picanha (pronounce PI-KAN-YA) and cook Brazilian rice and beans.

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What is Picanha, you might ask.

Picanha is actually the rump cap, and the most prized part of the cow in Brazil. A lot of restaurants will try to pass off the rest of the rump as Picanha – but know that Picanha is separated from the rest of the rump by a vein, and it is never heavier than 1.5kg (any bigger and you’re probably getting a “fake” and it will not be as tender or flavourful).

Buying meat in Singapore can be quite a blow to your wallet, which is why I like to get my meat from Australia (just because a lot of friends travel back and forth). There is a South American grocery store in Fitzroy Melbourne called Casa Iberica that sells the Picanha cut of the meat and it’s already sealed up, and easy to bring home.

However, if you don’t have any friends who are coming from Australia, the next cheapest place to get meat from is Zac Butchery. There are 2 outlets, one in Chun Tin & one in Figaro Street. I usually visit the Chun Tin outlet because I’m a Westie, and the butcher there prepared the rump cap for me. I am not sure if they will cut up a rump cap for you in other butchers, but Zac Butchery is quite flexible so I like ordering from them. Another suggestion is to perhaps visit your neighbourhood wet market and speak to the butcher there. You could ask them to order in the rump cap, and perhaps get a better price too. Just an idea of the price difference – in Melbourne, I paid about AUD30 for 1.5kg of Picanha, whereas I paid SGD27 for 400grams of Picanha here (although, the Picanha I got from here was a Wagyu, so it was a bit more premium but I don’t mind paying a little more because you can really taste the difference).

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Preparing the picanha is simple. Slice up the chunk of meat into 1 inch thick slices.

All you will need is coarse sea salt. Grab a plate and spread a layer of the salt on it, and just flip the meat on top of it so it collects the salt. When that’s done, place the meat on top on the already lit grill and sprinkle a little bit more salt on the top. Brazilian restaurants here cut down on the salt they cook with to meet Singaporean tastes, but it’s usually a lot saltier in Brazil. Don’t be surprised if you get lots of salt popping, especially if you’re using a charcoal grill. Also expect a few flare ups from the oil. Close the hood, grill until preferred done-ness (not forgetting to flip it), and take off the grill to rest the meat.

Usually, the meat isn’t consumed as a whole steak – it is cut up into slices and served with Brazilian Rice, black beans and Farofa (seasoned casava flour). Farofa can’t be found here, so I order it from Amazon and have it shipped via 65Daigou or VPOST. I usually order some Guarana Antartica (Guarana flavoured soda) at the same time. But these are all little luxuries I splurge on.

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I cook the Brazilian Rice and Black Beans on the side burner of the UC430 (for those of you wondering what the side burner is for, it usually turns the BBQ into an outdoor kitchen so you don’t have to go in and out of your home a million times). “Brazilian Rice” isn’t necessarily rice that’s made in Brazil, rather, it is a way to cook the rice. I use Jasmine rice in this instance, and the rice is first sauteed in oil and garlic paste/minced garlic and salt, before water is added into the pot. Use a larger pot, as a smaller pot can cause the rice to be mushy. As for the black beans, I usually make a whole batch in the pressure cooker – storing half in the freezer and cooking the rest (also with garlic and salt and oil).

The final dish looks like this:

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And Farofa comes in this packet:

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Jack of All Grills

Have you been looking for a grill that has it all… the looks, the features, the compactness…. with a price tag that won’t break the bank? Well, hold on to your hats because I think I’ve found it.

The Liberty Chef Pro is a 3 burner gas BBQ that has everything I look for in a BBQ.

Firstly, size is always an issue for me. I don’t like a BBQ to be too in your face, especially in an apartment balcony. This BBQ is small for a 3 burner unit, and on top of that, it has one collapsible side table.

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It comes with a warming rack and a motorized rotisserie.

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I love that it comes with 2 cast iron grills and 1 cast iron hot plate. I don’t use the hot plate that often, but it’s so good to have it there for when you have eggs, veggies or anything that crumbles.

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The side burner is so handy for sauces and soups. You practically have an outdoor kitchen in this machine.

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The downside to this BBQ is that you can’t fit the standard Singapore sized gas tank inside the cabinet. The cabinet is really very small. But I never recommend putting it inside anyway for safety reasons. I always have it stored outside, under the side table or behind the BBQ. It comes with a rain cover so you don’t have to worry about keeping it outdoors.

The Liberty Chef Pro is available from Liberty Patio at $999. This price is inclusive of delivery and assembly, rain cover, gas hose and regulator, and 1 year warranty. 

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