Tag Archives: bbq recipe

Beer, Can?

The weekend was quite exciting for me as I finally made time to do something I’ve always wanted to try – ROASTING A BEER CAN CHICKEN ($24)!

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I started out by making a marinade with Soy Sauce, Minced Garlic and Melted Butter. Just mix it all together (blend it in a blender is best because the mince garlic can be a bit chunky for the marinade injector)! Once that’s done, I had to set up the beer can chicken roaster.

The Napoleon Beer Can Chicken Roaster comes in 2 parts – the pan on the bottom and the metal legs that holds the chicken up. Insert the ends of the metal legs into the holes of the pan such that the legs are standing up. Then, grab a can of beer (or soda) and empty out half the can. Squeeze this can into the middle of the pan and beneath the metal legs. After which, you can place the butt of the chicken over the standing legs and can. If you like, you can even put half an onion inside the chicken before you do this for some extra flavor.

I used the Napoleon basting brush ($14) to cover all of the chicken (don’t forget to get into all the nooks and crannies) with the marinade. After which, I inserted the marinade injector ($19.90) into a few different meaty areas of the Chicken.

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Leave the chicken to soak up the marinade for a bit and use this time to light up the grill. I put the grill (Napoleon Lex485RSIB) at medium heat on 2 of the burners and I used my Napoleon Heat Resistant Gloves ($75) to place the chicken and roaster between them. It’s such good protection that I wasn’t afraid to get anywhere near the fire!

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I closed the hood and left it there for about 25-30 minutes, opening it up every 7 minutes to check on the chicken and to baste it with the marinade so it keeps moist and tasty. I also used a smoker cup ($45) with beer flavoured wood chips ($20) from Axtschlag to give it a smoky flavor.

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When the chicken was done, I took it off the grill and used the Napoleon Digital Thermometer ($29.90) to make sure (it’s done when the internal temperature is at 165 Degrees Fahrenheit or 75 Degress Celcius). It was so tender and juicy because of the marinade that had been injected into it, and the skin was crispy all over because it was exposed to the flames all around. Overall, it was a very delicious chicken and I would do it again!

To purchase any of these products, check out libertypatio.com or visit Butcher’s Dog (Great World City), Zac Butchery (Chun Tin or Figaro St) or Decofix (Serene Centre).

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Ai, Picanha! : Grilling the Brazilian Prize Cut

My latest BBQ obsession is Brazilian Churrasco (pronounced like SHOE-HASS-KO). I’ve always loved a good ol’ Brazilian BBQ, but churrasco restaurants are pretty limited here in Singapore and not to mention, pricey. So instead of eating out – I thought, why not just do it myself at home?

For this post, we’re using an Ultra Chef UC430 to grill Picanha (pronounce PI-KAN-YA) and cook Brazilian rice and beans.

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What is Picanha, you might ask.

Picanha is actually the rump cap, and the most prized part of the cow in Brazil. A lot of restaurants will try to pass off the rest of the rump as Picanha – but know that Picanha is separated from the rest of the rump by a vein, and it is never heavier than 1.5kg (any bigger and you’re probably getting a “fake” and it will not be as tender or flavourful).

Buying meat in Singapore can be quite a blow to your wallet, which is why I like to get my meat from Australia (just because a lot of friends travel back and forth). There is a South American grocery store in Fitzroy Melbourne called Casa Iberica that sells the Picanha cut of the meat and it’s already sealed up, and easy to bring home.

However, if you don’t have any friends who are coming from Australia, the next cheapest place to get meat from is Zac Butchery. There are 2 outlets, one in Chun Tin & one in Figaro Street. I usually visit the Chun Tin outlet because I’m a Westie, and the butcher there prepared the rump cap for me. I am not sure if they will cut up a rump cap for you in other butchers, but Zac Butchery is quite flexible so I like ordering from them. Another suggestion is to perhaps visit your neighbourhood wet market and speak to the butcher there. You could ask them to order in the rump cap, and perhaps get a better price too. Just an idea of the price difference – in Melbourne, I paid about AUD30 for 1.5kg of Picanha, whereas I paid SGD27 for 400grams of Picanha here (although, the Picanha I got from here was a Wagyu, so it was a bit more premium but I don’t mind paying a little more because you can really taste the difference).

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Preparing the picanha is simple. Slice up the chunk of meat into 1 inch thick slices.

All you will need is coarse sea salt. Grab a plate and spread a layer of the salt on it, and just flip the meat on top of it so it collects the salt. When that’s done, place the meat on top on the already lit grill and sprinkle a little bit more salt on the top. Brazilian restaurants here cut down on the salt they cook with to meet Singaporean tastes, but it’s usually a lot saltier in Brazil. Don’t be surprised if you get lots of salt popping, especially if you’re using a charcoal grill. Also expect a few flare ups from the oil. Close the hood, grill until preferred done-ness (not forgetting to flip it), and take off the grill to rest the meat.

Usually, the meat isn’t consumed as a whole steak – it is cut up into slices and served with Brazilian Rice, black beans and Farofa (seasoned casava flour). Farofa can’t be found here, so I order it from Amazon and have it shipped via 65Daigou or VPOST. I usually order some Guarana Antartica (Guarana flavoured soda) at the same time. But these are all little luxuries I splurge on.

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I cook the Brazilian Rice and Black Beans on the side burner of the UC430 (for those of you wondering what the side burner is for, it usually turns the BBQ into an outdoor kitchen so you don’t have to go in and out of your home a million times). “Brazilian Rice” isn’t necessarily rice that’s made in Brazil, rather, it is a way to cook the rice. I use Jasmine rice in this instance, and the rice is first sauteed in oil and garlic paste/minced garlic and salt, before water is added into the pot. Use a larger pot, as a smaller pot can cause the rice to be mushy. As for the black beans, I usually make a whole batch in the pressure cooker – storing half in the freezer and cooking the rest (also with garlic and salt and oil).

The final dish looks like this:

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And Farofa comes in this packet:

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