Monthly Archives: June 2016

The Meat Club

Last week, I was given some meat samples from The Meat Club. The Meat Club is an online meat supplier that takes orders on a subscription basis.

The subscription to the meat keeps the cost of meat low for consumers like you and me, and helps to prevent wastage because it’s easier for the store to keep track of how much meat is actually needed.

For example, a 250gm grain-fed Aussie ribeye steak will set you back about $23 – $25 on average at other online butcher stores, whereas on The Meat Club, you’re looking at an average of $15 – $16 per 250gm.

What’s more is that because of the way the meat is packaged, you can keep it up to 28 days in the fridge, and it’ll still taste super fresh! The meat is packed by using thermoform cryvac at a tier one processing plant, a process which aims to minimise (if not completely cut out) contaminant exposure on its journey to Singapore. And every step of the logistics supply chain is closely monitored to ensure a little changes  as possible in the temperature and humidity.

So how does the meat fare when it comes to taste? I put them on the grill to find out!

I tested out the Aussie grain-fed strip steak, and the lamb chops. I didn’t want to alter the taste of the meat too much, so I only added salt and a bit of pepper to enhance the flavour.

IMG_1589

Salting the Lamb Chops and Grain-fed strip steak (apologies for exposing your eyes to this heinous green chopping board!)

IMG_1591

Onto the BBQ Grill they go!

IMG_1590

So fresh and so tender! Nomnomnom…

The verdict?
The meat club delivers freshness as promised from their thermoform cryvac packaging, and the taste and quality of the meat hadn’t deteriorated despite the fact that I had left it in the fridge for about 4 days. The lamb chops were particularly delicious, as they were full and fatty. The steak was tender and juicy, even though I had cooked it more towards the medium-well range. All in all, I was very happy with the meat from the Meat Club.

To find out more about the meat club, or to subscribe, check out The Meat Club website.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Grills, Gas & Regulators: 101

I did a post about getting gas for your BBQ a while back (I mean, years back!) – so if any of you are looking for the 411 on gas tanks and canisters in Singapore, this would be the most updated info you can get.

WHICH WORKS WITH WHAT?
BRAND: Can I use any gas regulator for any brand of gas tank? The answer is no. Some gas tanks work with different gas regulators, while others do not. Always check with the company that supplied the gas regulator to you (whether it’s the BBQ company or the gas supplier) which brand of gas tank will be suitable for the regulator you’re using. Even if the regulator fits the tank, it doesn’t mean it will work.

TANK SIZE: Larger grills need different sized gas tanks from smaller grills – yes, this means different gas regulators too. For example, any BBQ with 4 burners or less would need a regulator for a 12.7kg gas tank, whereas any BBQ with more than 4 burners would need a regulator for a 11.3kg gas tank (I know, it is weird that the larger BBQ needs a smaller gas tank). This information is specific to Esso and Mobil LPG tanks.

HOW SMALL CAN I GO?
It’s really hard to get a small gas tank in Singapore – but for those of you who are looking – you can actually still find the 4.5kg ones here, but they are very pricey and you have to get a special regulator from the gas supplier too. Users only want the 4.5kg tank because they can store it in their BBQ cabinets, but really, it’s not practical or worth the buck because it runs out so fast and it’s about 2.5 times the price of a large tank. Furthermore, it’s not compatible with larger grills because there’s just not enough pressure in the tank to keep a large BBQ running.

Some BBQs like the TravelQ TQ285X and the TQ285 table top grill, have the option of regulators that work with camping gas. No, camping gas is not the same as the gas you use for steamboats. These run out really fast, but they’re bought more for the convenience of being able to take them around – especially if you intend to go camping somewhere or have a small picnic in the great outdoors.

If a large gas tank stored outside your BBQ cabinet really irks you because it’s too ugly, perhaps consider an LPG tank cover that comes in different colours.

orange &  black

“Tacky no more!” Exclaimed the LPG tank.

CAN I GET PIPED IN?
TOWN GAS: If you’re looking to connect your BBQ to town gas (or piped gas), it’s definitely possible. You will have to check with your BBQ supplier if they are able to do this for you. Do not do it yourself, as you risk forfeiting the grill warranty.

SAFETY FIRST!
My gas supplier offered me an adjustable regulator – should I use it?
I wouldn’t recommend using it because if the pressure has been adjusted incorrectly, you could be looking at a flaming disaster as sometimes too much gas is released (believe me, hand-to-heart, this has happened!). Instead, check with the BBQ supplier for their recommendation first.

Here are some tips from Union Energy on how to store your LPG tank safely.

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,